Pebble Mine has no place in Alaska’s Bristol Bay wilderness!

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NRDC (Natural Resources Defense Council)
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Help Stop Foreign Mining Company Investments in the Disastrous Pebble Mine

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Tell First Quantum’s CEO that the Pebble Mine has no place in Alaska’s Bristol Bay wilderness!

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Dear Roberta,

As you know, EPA Administrator Scott Pruitt cut a backroom deal with Canadian company Northern Dynasty Minerals last year that brought the Pebble Mine — a toxic, gold and copper mega-mine — back from the dead.

But Pruitt’s deal did more than just resurrect the project: it opened the door for Northern Dynasty to secure the investors it desperately needs to move the project forward. And they might have just found one.

Another Canadian company — First Quantum Minerals — recently announced a $150 million investment stake in the Pebble Mine fiasco.

This is URGENT: if we want to kill the disastrous Pebble Mine, we must shut off the investor money IMMEDIATELY.

Tell First Quantum’s CEO that you oppose their investment in the toxic Pebble Mine and that they should walk away from this deal.

Alaska’s Bristol Bay is considered one of America’s last great wild places. This spectacular swath of rivers, lakes, wetlands, and tundra is home to brown bears, whales, majestic bald eagles, and Native communities that thrive off its world-renowned salmon fishery.

A pristine Bristol Bay is not only an environmental imperative — it’s also an economic lifeline for the region. The watershed supplies half the world’s sockeye salmon and the fishery supports 14,000 jobs and generates $1.5 billion annually. And it’s also a beloved tourism destination.

But all that is threatened by the Pebble Mine, which could produce up to 10 billion tons of mining waste that would have to be stored forever in the rivers, streams, and wildlands of Bristol Bay. The mine would require the construction of massive infrastructure including 83 miles of roads, a 230-megawatt power plant, and a 188-mile natural gas pipeline.

Tell First Quantum that the Pebble Mine has no place in Alaska’s Bristol Bay wilderness!

Not only is the Pebble Mine bad for communities, wildlife, and the environment — it’s also a bad investment.

So bad that some of First Quantum’s major shareholders, including the California State Treasurer and the New York State Comptroller, have openly demanded that the company sever all ties with the controversial project.

And it’s so bad that three of the world’s largest mining companies — Mitsubishi, Anglo American, and Rio Tinto — have already walked away from the project, even after investing hundreds of millions of dollars.

We must now convince First Quantum to walk away, too.

Tell First Quantum NOT to invest in the Pebble Mine.

When the EPA reopened the door to the Pebble Mine last year, NRDC activists like you drove more than 115,000 public comments to the agency in opposition to the mine. And your voices were heard.

Recently, Pruitt backtracked — a bit — on his pro-Pebble agenda by formally acknowledging the huge environmental threats posed by mining in Bristol Bay.

But to actually kill this project once and for all, we need hundreds of thousands of activists around the world to exhibit the same powerful show of force to convince First Quantum NOT to invest in the Pebble Mine.

Make your voice heard again today.

Thanks for standing with us during this critical time.

Sincerely,

Rhea Suh
President, NRDC

 

P.S. Learn more about the destructive Pebble Mine by reading this blog by Deputy Director of the Marine Mammal Protection Project, Taryn Kiekow Heimer.

The mission of the Natural Resources Defense Council (NRDC) is to safeguard the Earth: its people, its plants and animals, and the natural systems on which all life depends.

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